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olds-cool

Compressor Question

7 posts in this topic

I've got a 60gal Campbell compressor with a bad 95-125 pressure switch. I'm shopping around for a new switch now and I'd kinda like to step it up a little bit and maybe get a 115-150 along with a higher rated pop off valve. I'm not really sure how high I can go safely. The tag on the tank reads MAWP 125 @ 450*F and MDMT -20*F @ 150PSI. So I understand that as a maximum working pressure of 125psi if the tank was at 450*. Well, I don't plan on working in an oven and see no way that the tank is gonna reach 450* unless the house is on fire, in which case I doubt I'd be using the air compressor or much worried about the exploding tank. So using a real world temp of say 200*, taking into account a hot 100* day and the heat generated by the pump, is there a way I can use those numbers to calculate a safe pressure? Am I making a big deal over 25psi or is it even worth it?

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I'd be more concerned about the age and condition of the tank when increasing pressure.

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If the tank isn't rusty from not being drained regularly it should be no problem. On the other hand what is the compressor rated for max pressure? Is it a single stage if so around a 100- 110 pounds is about it if compressor life is a concern. For reasonable compressor life at over 120 pounds per square inch you need a 2 stage pump. Most air tools are rated for no more than 120 psi. why do you need over 120?

Dusty

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Tank was manufactured in 92. Pump is a single stage and was rebuilt shortly before I got it from my dad. It was pretty well maintained so I'm not worried about it. There's really no need for more than 120 I guess. I was just hoping to pack a little more into the tank. Taking Daves advice, I guess I'll just order a new 95-125 switch and be happy with what I've got. Thanks guys. :thumbup1:

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As long as a compressor can reach and hold over 100psi, virtually all common air tools can be used, as long as the cfm rating of the compressor is about 10 percent average above the largest cfm required, you'll be fine. And by average I mean what tools will you be running commonly versus those on a limited basis. Here is chart of average cfm requirements:

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Edited by cozee

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If your just needing more volume try finding a second tank. I used to have a 150g. propane tank from a pickup conversion

in line with my upright 80g compressor lasted plenty long when using the blasting cabinet or the DA sanders. Top psi on the upright

was same as yours, propane tank was 250psi.

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